J. Williams & J. Timberlake Situation

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I’ve been following comments all day concerning Jessie William’s speech and Justin Timberlake’s response to Black Twitter on his comments to a black tweet.

What has transpired between these two interrelated events is in how white folks have responded to William’s speech by calling him racist while white folks have responded to Justin Timberlake’s Twitter response.

Background: Jessie Williams made an astounding and breathtaking speech about how our lives, BLACK LIVES MATTER. Justin Timberlake viewed the speech and tweeted:

@iJesseWilliams tho… #Inspired #BET2016

 

However, Ernest Owens responded to Justin’s tweet:

So does this mean you’re going to stop appropriating our music and culture? And apologize to Janet too. #BETAwards
This is Justin’s reply to Ernest:

Oh, you sweet soul. The more you realize that we are the same, the more we can have a conversation. Bye.
First, I want to respond to Justin’s response, and then, the comments that many have been making all day about both situations.

What I found problematic in what Justin said is how he responded to Ernest. Justin exercised his white privilege, pulling a “white power play” on Ernest. Ernest asked him a question, “So does this mean you’re going to stop appropriating our music and culture?” What is appropriation? Appropriation means to take ownership of someone else’s work without giving them due credit for it. Yes, Justin has cited his musical influences: Michael Jackson and Stevie Wonder. However, Blacks have a right to question Whites who are very successful when they make music that is black influenced music…are you giving a right amount of credit to black musicians? Ernest is calling out to Justin Timberlake for a response. Owens also directly calls to Timberlake in apologizing to Janet as well. This is directly at the Super Bowl 2004 Halftime show where Timberlake ripped Jackson’s bra, and her breast was shown on national television. Instead of sticking up for her and standing by her side, he took the road that was expected and didn’t agree with what happened during the time it was happening, but he did not take more action to further stick up for Jackson, either. Jackson was blamed and victimized while Timberlake didn’t nearly get harassed and villainized as Jackson.

Instead of addressing Owens head on with what he’s questioned and stated, Timberlake uses his white privilege to patronize and over power what Owens says in a colorblind racist statement:

“Oh, you sweet soul. The more you realize that we are the same, the more we can have a conversation. Bye.”

When I read this, I was infuriated. Maybe, just maybe Timberlake didn’t mean to come off as patronizing, but his statement did come off as patronizing. He avoids addressing black culture, cultural appropriation done to blacks, and not addressing how he used his white privilege card to not take the heat for what he did Janet Jackson in 2004. Instead of having a real, genuine conversation about race, Timberlake dismisses Owens by directly lumping in Owens as being the same as Timberlake…and Timberlake issuing silence because Timberlake cannot have a conversation with Owens until they realize that they are the same.

This is why we have colorblind racism. What Timberlake exposes is that I cannot talk to you if we aren’t on the same level. I will not talk to you until you, as black person, can identify with we have in common. This is a huge contradiction two-folded: The first folded contradiction is that if Timberlake was truly inspired by Jessie Williams speech, he would have taken a social justice action in having a conversation with Owens about the question he asked. The second folded contradiction is that Timberlake didn’t take anything from Williams’s speech to resonate with what Owens was asking. Owens is Black. Timberlake is White. From Owens’s perspective, Timberlake has made money off Black folks’ music. If Timberlake didn’t see it that way, he would have engaged in a conversation with Owens about why his music is heavily black influenced. Instead, Timberlake addressed Owens by being arrogant in exerting that Owens should understand where Timberlake is coming from by identifying that Owens is similar than Timberlake. This is Justin Timberlake’s biggest mistake. His biggest mistake is asking a person of color to get down to his level. In racial terms, for us, people of color, especially black folks in this country, many of us are and have gotten down on Timberlake’s level. Many of us have taken on white characteristics to get beyond the ghetto or the projects. I used Whiteness to pave a way as passing to “better myself from my Black welfare family.” However, while doing that, I silenced my blackness from emerging because I self-loathe myself thinking that Whiteness was my ticket to getting a better life.

Financially speaking, I do have it better than my mom and “stepfather,” but historically, I sacrificed my existing and emerging Blackness because I was told by my country, my community, my society, and Black and White culture that Whiteness was superior, and if you want to have anything, you must adopt White characteristics. I understand what Owens is doing, and I understand what Timberlake is doing. Owens is offended that Timberlake has made money off our music. Timberlake is offended that Owens questioned him.

For Timberlake to truly understand Jessie Williams’s speech would have been for Timberlake to open up a dialogue and ask Owens why he thinks that he is appropriating black music and culture…and to talk about his experience with what he did to Janet Jackson twelve years ago. By Timberlake using his white privilege, he also contributes to white supremacy by taking the heat off himself and placing it on…but we all are the same…and I won’t have a conversation with you until you bend will.

And this is what I see with most of the white folks’ comments on Facebook concerning Jessie Williams. All who are offended have similar responses like Timberlake expect that Timberlake wasn’t more explicit to Owens about being offended by Owens’s comments about race.

I’ve seen throughout the day some white folks responding to Jessie Williams’s speech as being racist against Whites. I’ve read some whites folks write that if white folks were in the same place as Williams and said that about black folks, they would be called racists. What these white folks in their comments don’t realize is that their comments are racistTheir comments are racist because they simply don’t get that black folks continue to experience racial oppression on so many levels in this country that it hinders them from actually being free. People of color suffer from having to be put on a watch list—all of us. If you aren’t “acting White,” you are a ghetto ass nigger, and you deserve to be abused in so many ways because you don’t follow the laws of the land. Well, those very laws are WHITE LAWS. That’s right. If you read Cheryl Harris’s Whiteness in Property, many of our existing laws are “white laws” that were made up from many white men who were wealthy and had slaves to increase their wealth. These laws have terrorize black people, and the enforcers of these laws are usually many white folks who exercise white supremacy.

To say that Williams is racist is using white privilege to not hear his message. Williams’s message was about how black people are in a racist systematic country where we are unable to truly be free in regards to how we contribute to American society. We cannot be free to be ourselves. We have always been second class citizens to Whiteness. Many of us have used Whiteness to have a better life, but many of us (including me) have silenced our Blackness and not embracing how different that we are.

Because now I understand it. We aren’t the same. We shouldn’t be the same. Being different is beyond acceptable. It is supposed to be our greatest quality in our American society. We are a melting pot, but we don’t act like it. Some white folks on Facebook said that Blacks continued to harp on race. They keep living in the past. We keep living in the past because the past has never resolved itself. We have never treated those wounds. So, we just keep ignoring them…we keep putting cream on them…thinking it is treating the infection, but the infection is only at bay, and it rages when we ignore it, thinking that it is healing, but the reality is that we are keeping it at bay.

I like Justin Timberlake, and I am a fan of his music. I believe he is quite talented, and he has done a lot for folks being a musician. However, I hope that the inspiration that he felt for Williams’s speech prompts aspiration in that it results in to action in learning more about Black history and black people. To learn more about Whiteness and how his white privilege hurts people. If he takes that action on being educated, then, I hope this inspiration from Williams’s speech takes on new meaning for him, and he actually uses his white privilege as social justice action to help educate other white people and have them realize that their white privilege and white supremacy harms people of color.

As for the racist comments on Facebook, yes, commenters are entitled to their opinions, but realize that other commenters are entitled to their opinions as well. As I told someone I love who is white, I am not trying to make you feel guilty about being White. You can’t change your skin color like I can’t change mines. You should be proud of being who you are. However, don’t exercise your race as means to hide behind what is really there. What is really there is this:

You are benefiting off the system of Whiteness that was set up for you over three hundred years ago. One way you are benefiting from it is not trying to empathize with Williams’s speech or with black folks’ stories. We aren’t complaining and whining. We are the oppressed group, and we have to deal with being mistreated due to you having your white privilege which contributes to white supremacy. The reason why you are saying that we are whining or bitching because you have never had to worry about whether your hands are on the steering wheel. You have never had to worry about running around your neighborhood while your white neighbor stares at you like you don’t belong in the same neighborhood. You never had to worry about being called a nigger. You certainly didn’t have to worry about if you were passed over a promotion because of your skin colored when you’ve worked your ass off every weekday.

Williams’s speech was inspirational because he was telling his people…we will make it through stronger and better. We always have.
S

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Lewis-1 and Ryan-0

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Publicist stunt! Paul Ryan, Republican House Speaker, “laid into Democrats on Thursday for causing ‘chaos’ in the House, dismissing their sit-in over gun legislation as nothing more than a publicity student and fundraising effort” (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/paul-ryan-democrats-sit-in_us_576c084ee4b0b489bb0c9b02). Led by the Civil Rights freedom fighter John Lewis, Democrats decided to sit-in Wednesday morning through Thursday to get their message across that their “No fly, no  buy” bill should pass. This bill would prevent individuals who are on a terrorist watch list to purchase a gun or guns. However, Ryan made this about Democrats pulling a political stunt to try to raise money off a tragedy (the horrible, tragic event in Orlando killing forty nine individuals and injuring fifty-three that were celebrating their lives at the LGBT nightclub, Pulse).

I find what Paul Ryan says is a continued legacy of cultural racism in our country. I would like to address Paul Ryan about his responses and how his words continue a legacy of cultural racism in our country.

Dear Paul Ryan,

This is not about Democrats pulling a stunt. This is about you practicing aspect of colorblind racism called cultural racism.

You have explained away in your outrage about “how dare Democrats sit-in to demand that their bill be passed: “‘This is Congress. [. . .]The House of Representatives! Oldest democracy in the world, and they’re descending it into chaos. I don’t think this should be a very proud moment for democracy or the people who staged these stunts’” ((http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/paul-ryan-democrats-sit-in_us_576c084ee4b0b489bb0c9b02). When you talk about “for the people who staged these stunts,” you mean John Lewis, right? You mean John Lewis who was a vital member of SNCC in the 1960s, right? John Lewis is the one who led the sit-in this past Wednesday, right? The rest of the Democrats followed his lead, right? Paul Ryan, your words are reinforcing and continuing the white supremacy that George Wallace and Lester Maddox practiced during their governing administrations in 1960s by identifying as segregationists. They continued Jim Crow laws in Alabama and Georgia, and many Blacks and Whites who were anti-racists activists were murdered for standing up for Blacks to insure that Blacks were able to have their freedoms. Paul Ryan, you say that you aren’t a racist, but you stated in an interview conducted by Bill Bennett from Morning in America that you “linked poverty to ‘this tailspin of culture, in our inner cities in particular, of men not working and just generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and the culture of work.’” (” (http://www.politico.com/magazine/story/2014/03/is-paul-ryan-racist-104687))

Well, how colorblind racism is that? Do you really think that you are talking about white men and men of color in that statement? You minimize your racist statement by retracting that race did not cross your mind, so who in the hell are you talking about when you use phrases like “poverty,” “inner cities,” “generations of men not even thinking about working or learning the value and culture of work?” You are fooling yourself if you think that came across as all American men. You did not have to say that it was men of color that did not know the value of work. Your descriptions in the same sentence point to it was men of color. Your statement evidently describes men of color, and it also signals to other white folks that you aren’t talking about white men. But to us, people of color like me? It signals that you are talking about black males. Black Americans are associated with inner city poverty. White folks are not described as such; they are discussed in the manner of “suburbia,” “the city life,” “working hard,” etc.

So, your reputation precedes you in your latest comments about “Democrats” making a disgrace to Congress and The House of Representatives for doing a sit-in as a publicity stunt to make money off the Orlando victims. For the past several decades, Democrats have a history of championing Black American causes. When you are talking about the “people who staged these stunts,” how dare you speak of setting a precedent when you continue to contribute to White supremacy by practicing cultural racism and speaking and saying that black folks pull these stunts—and the folks who aren’t black are race traitors for following them. John Lewis knows what is like for people of color to get killed by guns due to motivate racial violence. He stands on that floor knowing that the Orlando victims were killed due to an act of violence motivated by hatred. John Lewis doesn’t just sit-in for publicity stunts. John Lewis sits-in because it is his duty to continue to seek justice and to further fight for all Americans to exercise their freedoms in our country.

Paul Ryan, I call to action that you need to get schooled on Whiteness and White Privilege. I am sure that you wouldn’t because you are too deep into the system of Whiteness. Since I don’t believe you would do it, I challenge all other white people who are clouded by white privilege that contributed to White Supremacy to take a course in Whiteness and White Privilege. Or a multicultural course. Or could you all make time to read any of Tim Wise’s books? Or I double challenge you to step into the Other’s shoes? What about reading Toni Morrison, Alice Walker, Michael Eric Dyson, Melissa Harris-Perry, or Brother Cornel West? Don’t worry. If you check all that I mention out, I am sure that there is something I kind find you to enlighten you on your white privilege.

As for you, Paul Ryan, instead of you reading all that Ayn Rand and objectivism, you need to get real and start reading about people of color. You are obviously minimizing your racism due to the white privilege you possess that contributes to the ongoing white supremacy in this country. You have no respect for John Lewis and people of color by calling us “people who pull these stunts.” Get with it, Friend. You fall right in line with your predecessors, Wallace and Maddox. They said, too, that John, Martin, and the rest of the freedom fighters in the Civil Rights Movement…their sit-ins were publicity stunts as well.

What you fail to realize is that our publicity stunts are calls to action. And John Lewis and Co. are transforming the White House. Didn’t we do that when we elected President Barack Obama?

From a Black Cisgender Feminist,
S

A Biological Fatherless Black Girl

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Little black girls who never met their biological black fathers is a sludge puddle to always step in when you are a thirty four year old black woman who has never met her biological father.

As I see all the pictures of black women who know their fathers, it is bittersweet. I am happy for black women who know their fathers—especially the black daughters who have great relationships with their fathers. However, I am one of those black women that story goes into I never met my father. I am one of those black women whose mother despised my father and took her pain out on me because he wasn’t there to bear it. I am one of those black women who is reminded with the question: Father, why didn’t you try harder to meet me?

My backstory is that my father did come around to visit everyone else in Cochran. I found this out from a custodian working at MGC when I was in my second year. She told me that she knew who I was and knew who my dad was. She encouraged me to go and see him. Yet, I didn’t have any interest because I didn’t know what I would say to my father. All I know is that he is the imaginary father. What is ironic is that he was physically absent in my life but was presently there through the negative stories my mother told about him. When my mom would get angry, upset, or frustrated at me, she would always project her feelings of hatred on me because I look like my father. Now, you ask, “Wow, Sophia, I am surprised that you function as well as you.”

I function as well as I do because I have come to some understandings about myself. Yes, if my dad wanted it, a relationship with my father would have been phenomenal in the fact that it would have helped me with some of the life challenges that I had to face as a youngster. However, that Catch-22 is always there, right? If I had a relationship with my father, it might not have been a positive one and could have caused further damage to me. There are men out there who have made children, but they are not father material. They aren’t parent material. I am not saying that my father is incapable of being a good father. However, my mother had hostile feelings towards him. When he did return and ask her to marry him, she turned him down. To be fair to my mom, it might not have been solely the hurt he caused her (She approached his car to tell him she was pregnant with me, and he rolled up the window in her face before she spotted him with another woman in his car). She could have turn him down so he wouldn’t hurt her farther. Whatever her reasons where, her decisions transpired and had to grow up with my father being the bad guy. If he was the bad guy, then, there was a part of me that was bad, right, because he gave me 23 of his chromosomes, correct?

However, there are historical implications to this. A lot of us black women who have never met our black fathers feel a deep lost because American slavery broke a part black families. Black family members would be sold off for profit, or some American white slaver owners would sell off slave family members as punishment if that slave member went against the order of the slave owners’ rules. How can black men in the later generations be fathers—and be presently there for their daughters, when they come from black family lineages where their families were broken up during that time in history? Then, this matter is more complicated as well when white male slave owners raped black female slaves, and they birth children of color that was enslaved. Usually, your mother did not tell you who your father was because of the shame and guilt that resulted from the slave owner being able to rape you whenever he wanted, and you bore his children resulting from that trauma. Many black children did not have a chance to have relationships with their biological fathers. If their fathers were white, they were white slave owners who raped their mothers. If their fathers were black, their black fathers were sold off to another plantation. Or their black fathers died from being killed white masters when they escaped. Of course, when slaves were free, if you had a black father during Jim Crow and he died, he was lynched. If you had a black father during the Civil Rights Movement, he was slaughtered. If you had a father during the 1990s, you lost him because he murdered your mother.

Of course, there are many black fathers who abandoned their daughters or who were forced to not see their daughters for whatever reasons…and those daughter went through all kinds of hell. The hell of not knowing what does twenty-three chromosomes are like. Not knowing the other side of your family. Not knowing which characteristics you have inherited. I am a mystery, you all. I’ve discovered some pieces of the puzzles, and I have been able to fit them into the appropriate places in the puzzle. Yet, there are other pieces I am missing. The pieces that I have are good. I mean because I know how the overall puzzle looks. However, the puzzle would look much more rich…much more detailed…and most of all, I could completely analyze my entire identity and say…hey, that’s is where I get that quality from.

For little black girls like me when we were younger, it was hell because you are searching from who you look like in the mirror. Who you are starts off with your people. I’ve always been amazed by white friends and family who have taken advantage of their family lineage. They can trace back their family history and understand why they are who they are. However, many I’ve known…shrug their shoulders and don’t think it is a big deal. Why shouldn’t it? It is a privilege that they have. It is always there at their disposable when they question why they are who they are…they don’t even go to the answers that are right under their noses. Everything they possibly need to know is in that family lineage.

You know why Black folks make a HUGE FUCKING DEAL about their roots? We make a huge deal about our roots because there are pieces of us that are missing that we would like to know to have a much richer identity. Our family lines have been broken by white supremacist, white privilege, and Whiteness. Some of us are scrambling like I am. I am scrambling and scraping to find out MORE ABOUT WHO I AM. Don’t get it twisted. I am proud of who I am. What I do know about myself and the experiences I’ve been through have made me who I am today. Yet, black folks who find those pieces of their family history that makes them identify with their characteristics that drive them to make choices to strengthen who they are…they are appreciative of it because it was never a luxury for us. It is a birth right that has been STOLEN from us. Your family history is not a privilege it is a right. It is a right to know who you are and where you come from. That was taken from us. My people and I…some of us try so hard to find those pieces.

I can’t say Happy Father’s Day to my father because I don’t know him. I am one of those black girls who have never met him.

S